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Bugs BUGS BUGS an maybe some kinds of worms an aphids to

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#1 MrsMcGreggor

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 06:00 AM

I don't see where to put or make a BUG room.
have noticed round skool der kind of like in da wild
Der just kind of scatterd all over the place.
well I wanted to make a one stop bug place.
BUT don't know where to put it.
with the gorilla growing in da summer.
folks with gardens, ders a lot of pests out there.
soooooooooooo
I was thinking a one stop place for BUGS.
I think der kind of fun to look up.
example:
what sparkey brought in today off the Hops.
Posted Image
As many gardeners can attest, root maggots are a pernicious destroyer of garden crops.
Root maggots are the larvae of numerous species of dark gray flies (family - Anthomyiidae) that look like the common housefly, only smaller.
Posted Image
The adult flies lay their eggs in the soil in the spring or early summer at the base of host plants. The eggs hatch into maggots that feed underground on succulent roots, riddling them with tunnels and inducing rot. Affected plants lack vigor, may be stunted or yellowed, and often wilt during the heat of the day. After feeding for 1-3 weeks, maggots begin to pupate in plant roots or the surrounding soil. There are several generations per year.
These pests require cool, moist weather, a good description of Oregon in June and are generally limited in distribution to areas north of the 40th parallel.
Maggots (1/3 - 1/4 inch long) are small, yellowish white, legless larvae with tapered or pointed heads and blunt rear ends.
Posted Image
There are many methods of root maggot control, some more effective than others. The USDA recommends application of a registered pesticide such as Diazinon to the entire seedbed before planting or transplanting,
An organic method is the use of beneficial nematodes (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis). Nematodes are parasitic round worms available at many garden supply outlets. They come in sponges soaked with millions of the critters. The sponges are squeezed into watering cans or sprayers and applied at the base of infested plants. The nematodes swim down into the soil (moist soil is necessary) and if they encounter a root maggot, they bore into the body wall. Once inside they release bacteria that kills the host maggot. Nematodes will also lay eggs and multiply, protecting plants throughout the growing season (if the soil is kept moist).
Of course, if the host plant already has its roots chewed by root maggots and rot has set in, that plant cannot be saved.
Nematodes will attack the larvae of fleas, gnats, craneflies, corn borers, cutworms, and cucumber beetles, as well as fly maggots.
If your garden plants, especially young transplants, are wilting from root maggot infestations, it may be too late. The best thing is to apply nematodes at time of planting, repeating the application every 8 weeks or so.

I think it would be neat to keep da bugs all together In one area
with organtic an Non Organtic measures for control.
:DA Bunny:{still got all the buggie info I have looked Up in the past for folks to}
so could be neat to compile it all together.


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#2 skh

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 08:31 AM

great read MrsM, thanks...

I think we could use an insect and pest forum too. it is something we're missing.

#3 skh

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 08:48 AM

here is the link to the forum...

http://www.skunkskoo...nd-Garden-Pests

you may realise too that you are already in the bugs and pests forum... but i know what stoners are like.

#4 twistyman

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 11:20 AM

Good idea Mrs.........

#5 weezer

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 01:22 PM

Great idea BUGGY
I mean bunny

That root maggot fly.i would have just thought it was a skinny house fly
I have seen them before

Going to have to read your post a little closer latter
Isee it mention crane fly took me forty years to find out what those where ,people used to tell me they where male mosquitoes
I also see that nasty cut worm mention

#6 ...

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 01:59 PM

i'm pretty sure i killed one of those near my veg area a couple days ago. I thought it might be a mosquito but i couldn't see a straw. looked like a mosquito without the straw, maybe a little bigger too.

I'm going to set up my electrified UV zapper in the veg area. now summer is here it is a wise move.

#7 doc111

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 12:31 PM

I'm a little confused. Are these "root maggots" the same thing as a fungus gnat? If so, I am curious about the most effective way to use mosquito dunks for fungus gnat control in soil. I've seen posts about people using them but never any instructions on the most effective way to use them. I don't want to jack this thread but any help would be appreciated.hoo_ka

#8 MrsMcGreggor

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 02:49 PM

I'm a little confused. Are these "root maggots" the same thing as a fungus gnat? If so, I am curious about the most effective way to use mosquito dunks for fungus gnat control in soil. I've seen posts about people using them but never any instructions on the most effective way to use them. I don't want to jack this thread but any help would be appreciated.hoo_ka

that is a good question, yet as one can see
the tell tail differancs is EASY to spot.
A fungas Gnat has antenas. an a darker more elongated body.
Posted Imagepic from Bugguide.net
remember root maggots look like little house flys this is why so many confuse the
not so distructive common house fly with the root maggot.


Fresh medium/mix is the fastest and most effective method found for the control of Fungus Gnats Posted Image
The key to getting rid of Fungus Gnats is to disrupt their life cycle.
Their life cycle is about 28 days
and the adult fly lives for about 7 of those days

I have never used mosquito dunks But am always willing to learn new ideas
so I looked it up.
Posted Image
Floating the dunks in a watering container will prevent mosquito larvae from developing in the container, and that water that has been conditioned with a dunk containing Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies Israelensis (BTI) for a day or more can be used as a soil drench to get rid of fungus gnat larvae.
BTI is not harmful to humans, birds, fish or mammals. Deemed Fit For Organic production by the USEPA in accordance with the USDA's National Organic Program.
========= http://forums.garden...1140468011.html
Read the directions on the package, a Mosquito dunk will treat a small pond. You will generally only need to pinch off teaspoon sized chunk for a gallon or two of water. Once applied, the bacteria is ingested by the fungus gnat larvae. The bacteria rapidly reproduces in the stomach of the larvae tricking it into thinking it is full. The larvae stops eating, and dies. Grind a dunk up and mix it in the repotting medium, keep one dunk floating in your watering can. The ground up parts will release the bacteria in the soil, whilst watering with the water that has the dunk floating in it will continue the release of bacteria over a prolonged period.

Edited by MrsMcGreggor, 05 June 2010 - 02:54 PM.

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#9 doc111

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:14 PM

that is a good question, yet as one can see
the tell tail differancs is EASY to spot.
A fungas Gnat has antenas. an a darker more elongated body.
Posted Imagepic from Bugguide.net
remember root maggots look like little house flys this is why so many confuse the
not so distructive common house fly with the root maggot.


Fresh medium/mix is the fastest and most effective method found for the control of Fungus Gnats Posted Image
The key to getting rid of Fungus Gnats is to disrupt their life cycle.
Their life cycle is about 28 days
and the adult fly lives for about 7 of those days

I have never used mosquito dunks But am always willing to learn new ideas
so I looked it up.
Posted Image
Floating the dunks in a watering container will prevent mosquito larvae from developing in the container, and that water that has been conditioned with a dunk containing Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies Israelensis (BTI) for a day or more can be used as a soil drench to get rid of fungus gnat larvae.
BTI is not harmful to humans, birds, fish or mammals. Deemed Fit For Organic production by the USEPA in accordance with the USDA's National Organic Program.
========= http://forums.garden...1140468011.html
Read the directions on the package, a Mosquito dunk will treat a small pond. You will generally only need to pinch off teaspoon sized chunk for a gallon or two of water. Once applied, the bacteria is ingested by the fungus gnat larvae. The bacteria rapidly reproduces in the stomach of the larvae tricking it into thinking it is full. The larvae stops eating, and dies. Grind a dunk up and mix it in the repotting medium, keep one dunk floating in your watering can. The ground up parts will release the bacteria in the soil, whilst watering with the water that has the dunk floating in it will continue the release of bacteria over a prolonged period.

Awesome! Thank you for the info. I fight fungus gnats constantly. They don't typically cause me too many problems but when I start to see a few flyers I know it's time to go back into battle. I've never used the dunks before but I bought some and wanted to try them. I can't get Gnatrol where I live which has the same Active ingredient-Bt-i. weed_4u

So these root maggots and fungus gnats are similar, yes? Do you know if the Bt-i works on both fungus gnats and root maggots?

#10 MrsMcGreggor

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:48 PM

So these root maggots and fungus gnats are similar, yes? Do you know if the Bt-i works on both fungus gnats and root maggots?
In short YEP works in both. BUT keep an eye on the
TYPE of BT used. there are 3 main types used.
{1.} - Kurstaki strain
Brand name:
(Biobit, Dipel, MVP, Steward, Thuricide, etc.):
Vegetable insects
Cabbage worm (cabbage looper, imported cabbageworm, diamondback moth, etc.).
Tomato and tobacco hornworm.
Field and forage crop insects
European corn borer (granular formulations have given good control of first generation corn borers).
Alfalfa caterpillar, alfalfa webworm.
Fruit crop insects
Leafroller.
Achemon sphinx.
Tree and shrub insects
Tent caterpillar.
Fall webworm.
Leafroller.
Red-humped caterpillar.
Spiny elm caterpillar.
Western spruce budworm.
Pine budworm.
Pine butterfly.
{2} - Israelensis strains
Brand Name:
(Vectobac, Mosquito Dunks, Gnatrol, Bactimos, etc.)
Mosquito.
Black fly.
Fungus gnat.
{3} - San diego/tenebrionis strains
Brand name:
(Trident, M-One, M-Trak, Foil, Novodor, etc.)
Colorado potato beetle.
Elm leaf beetle.
Cottonwood leaf beetle.
_________________
Bt does not control shore flies, another common fly found in greenhouses.

Edited by MrsMcGreggor, 05 June 2010 - 03:53 PM.


#11 MrsMcGreggor

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:54 PM

the univercity of colorado has a wonderful fact sheet on BT an the
use of BT. { http://www.ext.colos...sect/05556.html }
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a naturally occurring bacterial disease of insects. These bacteria are the active ingredient in some insecticides.
Bt insecticides are most commonly used against some leaf- and needle-feeding caterpillars. Recently, strains have been produced that affect certain fly larvae, such as mosquitoes, and larvae of leaf beetles.
Bt is considered safe to people and nontarget species, such as wildlife. Some formulations can be used on essentially all food Crops.
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is an insecticide with unusual properties that make it useful for pest control in certain situations. Bt is a naturally occurring bacterium common in soils throughout the world. Several strains can infect and kill insects. Because of this property, Bt has been developed for insect control. At present, Bt is the only "microbial insecticide" in widespread use.
The insecticidal activity of Bt was first discovered in 1911. However, it was not commercially available until the 1950s. In recent years, there has been tremendous renewed interest in Bt. Several new products have been developed, largely because of the safety associated with Bt-based insecticides.
Properties
Unlike typical nerve-poison insecticides, Bt acts by producing proteins (delta-endotoxin, the "toxic crystal") that reacts with the cells of the gut lining of susceptible insects. These Bt proteins paralyze the digestive system, and the infected insect stops feeding within hours. Bt-affected insects generally die from starvation, which can take several days.
Occasionally, the bacteria enter the insect's blood and reproduce within the insect. However, in most insects it is the reaction of the protein crystal that is lethal to the insect. Even dead bacteria containing the proteins are effective insecticides.
The most commonly used strain of Bt (kurstaki strain) will kill only leaf- and needle-feeding caterpillars. In the past decade, Bt strains have been developed that control certain types of fly larvae (israelensis strain, or Bti). These are widely used against larvae of mosquitoes, black flies and fungus gnats.
More recently, strains have been developed with activity against some leaf beetles, such as the Colorado potato beetle and elm leaf beetle (san diego strain, tenebrionis strain). Among the various Bt strains, insecticidal activity is specific. That is, Bt strains developed for mosquito larvae do not affect caterpillars. Development of Bt products is an active area and many manufacturers produce a variety of products. Effectiveness of the various formulations may differ.
Disadvantages
Bt is susceptible to degradation by sunlight. Most formulations persist on foliage less than a week following application. Some of the newer strains developed for leaf beetle control become ineffective in about 24 hours.
Manufacturers are experimenting with several techniques to increase its persistence. One involves inserting Bt toxic crystal genes into other species of bacteria that can better survive on leaf surfaces (e.g., the M-Trak formulation of san diego strain).
The highly specific activity of Bt insecticides might limit their use on Crops where problems with several pests occur, including nonsusceptible insects (aphids, grasshoppers, etc.). As strictly a stomach poison insecticide, Bt must be eaten to be effective, and application coverage must be thorough. This further limits its usefulness against pests that are susceptible to Bt but rarely have an opportunity to eat it in field use, such as codling moth or corn earworm that tunnel into plants. Additives (sticking or wetting agents) often are useful in a Bt application to improve performance, allowing it to cover and resist washing.
Since Bt does not kill rapidly, users may incorrectly assume that it is ineffective a day or two after treatment. This, however, is merely a perceptual problem, because Bt-affected insects eat little or nothing before they die.
Bt-based products tend to have a shorter shelf life than other insecticides. Manufacturers generally indicate reduced effectiveness after two to three years of storage. Liquid formulations are more perishable than dry formulations. Shelf life is greatest when storage conditions are cool, dry and out of direct sunlight.
Advantages
The specific activity of Bt generally is considered highly beneficial. Unlike most insecticides, Bt insecticides do not have a broad spectrum of activity, so they do not kill beneficial insects. This includes the natural enemies of insects (predators and parasites), as well as beneficial pollinators, such as honeybees. Therefore, Bt integrates well with other natural controls. For example, in Colorado, Bt to control corn borers in field corn has been stimulated by its ability to often avoid later spider mite problems. Mite outbreaks commonly result following destruction of their natural enemies by less selective treatments.
Perhaps the major advantage is that Bt is essentially nontoxic to people, pets and wildlife. This high margin of safety recommends its use on food Crops or in other sensitive sites where pesticide use can cause adverse effects.
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#12 doc111

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 06:47 PM

the univercity of colorado has a wonderful fact sheet on BT an the
use of BT. { http://www.ext.colos...sect/05556.html }
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a naturally occurring bacterial disease of insects. These bacteria are the active ingredient in some insecticides.
Bt insecticides are most commonly used against some leaf- and needle-feeding caterpillars. Recently, strains have been produced that affect certain fly larvae, such as mosquitoes, and larvae of leaf beetles.
Bt is considered safe to people and nontarget species, such as wildlife. Some formulations can be used on essentially all food Crops.
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is an insecticide with unusual properties that make it useful for pest control in certain situations. Bt is a naturally occurring bacterium common in soils throughout the world. Several strains can infect and kill insects. Because of this property, Bt has been developed for insect control. At present, Bt is the only "microbial insecticide" in widespread use.
The insecticidal activity of Bt was first discovered in 1911. However, it was not commercially available until the 1950s. In recent years, there has been tremendous renewed interest in Bt. Several new products have been developed, largely because of the safety associated with Bt-based insecticides.
Properties
Unlike typical nerve-poison insecticides, Bt acts by producing proteins (delta-endotoxin, the "toxic crystal") that reacts with the cells of the gut lining of susceptible insects. These Bt proteins paralyze the digestive system, and the infected insect stops feeding within hours. Bt-affected insects generally die from starvation, which can take several days.
Occasionally, the bacteria enter the insect's blood and reproduce within the insect. However, in most insects it is the reaction of the protein crystal that is lethal to the insect. Even dead bacteria containing the proteins are effective insecticides.
The most commonly used strain of Bt (kurstaki strain) will kill only leaf- and needle-feeding caterpillars. In the past decade, Bt strains have been developed that control certain types of fly larvae (israelensis strain, or Bti). These are widely used against larvae of mosquitoes, black flies and fungus gnats.
More recently, strains have been developed with activity against some leaf beetles, such as the Colorado potato beetle and elm leaf beetle (san diego strain, tenebrionis strain). Among the various Bt strains, insecticidal activity is specific. That is, Bt strains developed for mosquito larvae do not affect caterpillars. Development of Bt products is an active area and many manufacturers produce a variety of products. Effectiveness of the various formulations may differ.
Disadvantages
Bt is susceptible to degradation by sunlight. Most formulations persist on foliage less than a week following application. Some of the newer strains developed for leaf beetle control become ineffective in about 24 hours.
Manufacturers are experimenting with several techniques to increase its persistence. One involves inserting Bt toxic crystal genes into other species of bacteria that can better survive on leaf surfaces (e.g., the M-Trak formulation of san diego strain).
The highly specific activity of Bt insecticides might limit their use on Crops where problems with several pests occur, including nonsusceptible insects (aphids, grasshoppers, etc.). As strictly a stomach poison insecticide, Bt must be eaten to be effective, and application coverage must be thorough. This further limits its usefulness against pests that are susceptible to Bt but rarely have an opportunity to eat it in field use, such as codling moth or corn earworm that tunnel into plants. Additives (sticking or wetting agents) often are useful in a Bt application to improve performance, allowing it to cover and resist washing.
Since Bt does not kill rapidly, users may incorrectly assume that it is ineffective a day or two after treatment. This, however, is merely a perceptual problem, because Bt-affected insects eat little or nothing before they die.
Bt-based products tend to have a shorter shelf life than other insecticides. Manufacturers generally indicate reduced effectiveness after two to three years of storage. Liquid formulations are more perishable than dry formulations. Shelf life is greatest when storage conditions are cool, dry and out of direct sunlight.
Advantages
The specific activity of Bt generally is considered highly beneficial. Unlike most insecticides, Bt insecticides do not have a broad spectrum of activity, so they do not kill beneficial insects. This includes the natural enemies of insects (predators and parasites), as well as beneficial pollinators, such as honeybees. Therefore, Bt integrates well with other natural controls. For example, in Colorado, Bt to control corn borers in field corn has been stimulated by its ability to often avoid later spider mite problems. Mite outbreaks commonly result following destruction of their natural enemies by less selective treatments.
Perhaps the major advantage is that Bt is essentially nontoxic to people, pets and wildlife. This high margin of safety recommends its use on food Crops or in other sensitive sites where pesticide use can cause adverse effects.

Very informative! Thank you once again.:D

#13 skriblz

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 08:48 AM

Oh I seen those before haha :\
Shit theyre annoying. I tought they were bby fliessss
i just pull out the raid and shoot them down like suicide bombers in pearl harbor

#14 MrsMcGreggor

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 07:49 PM

Oh I seen those before haha :\
Shit theyre annoying. I tought they were bby fliessss
i just pull out the raid and shoot them down like suicide bombers in pearl harbor

RIP_heheheRIP_heheheRIP_heheheYEEKKKKKKKKKKKKK RIP_heheheRIP_heheheRIP_hehehe
YOU don't REALLY spray raid round near your babys do you?
ya know you got fans going in der so it blowes all over da place.
have ya ever looked at da hazmat sheets on dat stuff???
Toxicity for Raid flying insect killer.

Summary Toxicity Information for the Active Ingredients in this Product
For detailed chemical information click on the chemical names below

Active Ingredients Chemical Name
Posted Image D-Allethrin ...Toxicity 2Moderate Carcinogen Posted ImageDevelopmental or
Reproductive Toxin
Posted Image Endocrine Disruptor Suspected Acute Aquatic
Toxicity
Posted Image

Posted Image Piperonyl butoxide ...Toxicity Moderate Carcinogen Possible Developmental or
Reproductive Toxin
Possible Endocrine Disruptor Suspected Acute Aquatic
Toxicity
Moderate

Posted Image Tetramethrin ...Toxicity Slight Carcinogen Possible Developmental or
Reproductive Toxin
Posted Image Endocrine Disruptor Posted ImageAcute Aquatic
Toxicity
Posted Image

Posted Image Phenothrin ...Toxicity Slight Carcinogen Not Likely Developmental or
Reproductive Toxin
http://www.pesticide...tion_mark4a.gif Endocrine Disruptor Suspected Acute Aquatic
Toxicity
http://www.pesticide...ages/skull7.gif

http://www.pesticide...nk.gifIndicates high toxicity in the given toxicological category.http://www.pesticideinfo.org/images/question_markshrunk.gifIndicates no available weight-of-the-evidence assessment. For additional information on toxicity from scientific journals or registration documents, see the "Additional Resources for Toxicity " section of the chemical detail page for each active ingredient.1. PAN Bad Actors are chemicals that are one or more of the following: highly acutely toxic, cholinesterase inhibitor, known/probable carcinogen, known groundwater pollutant or known reproductive or developmental toxicant. NOTE! Because there are no authoritative lists of Endocrine Disrupting (ED) chemicals, EDs are not yet considered PAN Bad Actor chemicals.2. The acute toxicity reported here is for the pure active ingredient only and may not reflect the acute toxicity of individual pesticide products. The acute toxicity of this product can be found in the Product ID section of this page, the Acute Hazard Warning Label.

:rollseyes:I don't think I be wanting that around anything I be Putting me My body.
ya know ders a whole lot safer stuff den dat.

:redface2:sorry if I sound like your mother.:redface2:
But you may wanna concider somthing with out da skull an cross bones on da lable.
huh?

o an btw YOU can click on all dem fancy words an see da side effects an find out what it all means.
made dat special Like that JUST for you.:kiss:


Edited by MrsMcGreggor, 06 June 2010 - 07:53 PM.

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#15 weezer

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 08:33 PM

Hi Bunny
Do you think Neem oil would be any help against cut worm??Either as a soil drench, foliar or both

#16 MrsMcGreggor

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 11:07 PM

Hi Bunny
Do you think Neem oil would be any help against cut worm??Either as a soil drench, foliar or both

This is a trickey question cuz da answeer is Yes an No.
YES it will stop cutworms
NO not with out regular frequent aplications.
neem oil breaks down fast under da suns rays
also depends on the strength you use. NOT all neems are da same.
get the 100% an mix stronger an attack the plant an the ground. folks do not relize neem really is systemic yep a plant will absorb it.
Neem Oil Amounts For Insect Spray
For 1 liter of a 0.5 % dilution of neem plant spray you need:
5 ml neem oil
1-2 ml insecticidal soap or other detergent
1 liter warm water
To convert into US measurements:
Five ml make a teaspoon. One litre is roughly a quart
Just multiply these amounts if you want to make a bigger batch. If you want to make a more concentrated batch multiply both the amount of neem oil and the amount of soap used:
For 20 liters of a 1% solution of neem insect spray you need:
200 ml neem oil
20 ml insecticidal soap
20 liters of water
If you have trouble dissolving the oil, use more detergent.
Method For Preparing Neem Insect Spray
Use warm water if possible. If making a large batch make a premix in a small amount of warm water, then add that into the big container. Mix the warm water with the soap first! Then slowly add the oil while stirring vigorously. Fill the mix into your sprayer. (Or fill the premix into your sprayer, which should already contain the rest of the water. Mix well.) Keep shaking or otherwise agitating the mix while spraying.
Use the mixture within eight hours.
Now I tried neem on da apple trees an it wasent that good.
because it broke down to fast. I think I would hit it with two things
espically if i was around a low water area or near a crop field.
neem and one of dez.
{1.} - Kurstaki strainBrand name:(Biobit, Dipel, MVP, Steward, Thuricide, etc.):
Vegetable insects
Cabbage worm (cabbage looper, imported cabbageworm, diamondback moth, etc.).
Tomato and tobacco hornworm.
Field and forage crop insects
European corn borer (granular formulations have given good control of first generation corn borers).


If anyone don't know what we are talking about chewwy got one last year.
dis was HIS worm...
pic i found------------------------------------------------------------chewwys worm he found

Posted Image

Stalk Borers in Colorado Field Corn
European Corn Borer
Description
Posted Image Figure 1: European corn borer egg mass. (Photo by S.D. Pilcher)

Posted Image Figure 2: European corn borer larva. (Photo by F.B. Peairs)

Posted Image Figure 3: European corn borer female (left) and male (right) moths. (Photo by F.B. Peairs).

Posted Image Figure 4: Feeding signs of the European corn borer. (Photo by S.D. Pilcher).
European corn borer eggs are laid in masses of 15 to 30. The egg masses have a scaly, glossy white appearance (Figure 1). As the eggs mature, the black head capsules of the developing larvae become visible, which is known as the “blackhead stage.” European corn borer larvae are cream colored to pinkish caterpillars which are marked with small, round brown spots (Figure 2). The head capsule is dark or reddish brown. Fully developed larvae are about one inch (25 millimeters) in length. Male moths are distinctly darker and slightly smaller than the pale yellow female moth (Figure 3). The average adult wing span is about one inch. The forewings are buff colored with darker bands running in wavy lines.
Life History
European corn borer usually has two generations in Colorado, although a single generation may occur at higher elevations and a partial third generation has been observed on occasion. The two generations are quite different in damage and management because they occur at different stages in crop growth and development.
First generation. European corn borers overwinter as fully grown larvae in corn stalks and other plant residues. In early spring they pupate and emerge as moths during late May or early June. Adults fly at night but do not cause damage. On warm, calm, humid evenings in June, female moths fly from weedy or grassy margins into corn fields and lay eggs. Eggs are laid in masses on the underside of corn leaves, usually near the midrib. Once an egg mass reaches the blackhead stage, hatching will generally occur within 36 hours. Survival is poor on small plants (less than 18 inches). Larvae require from four to six weeks to complete development. Mature larvae pupate within the corn stalk. The second flight of moths emerges from mid-July to early August to lay the eggs of the second generation.
Second generation. Female summer moths prefer to lay eggs in corn that is tasseling and in the green silk stage. Later-maturing fields are more attractive to egg-laying moths than fields approaching maturity. These larvae usually overwinter and do not pupate until the following spring.
Damage
Newly hatched, first generation larvae feed first on the leaf near where they hatched. As the larvae grow they move to the whorl or leaf sheath area and feed. When leaves emerge, the “shot hole” feeding signs (Figure 4) in the leaves can be seen. Most of the mature larvae will bore into the stalks, feed, and finish development there. First generation damage includes leaf feeding and stalk boring.

Most second generation eggs are laid in the middle of the plant, on the undersides of the ear leaf and the three leaves above and the three leaves below the ear leaf. Newly hatched second generation larvae first feed on leaves and pollen in leaf axils and then move to leaf sheaths and collars, and ear tips. Partially grown larvae bore into the tassels, ear shanks, ears, and stalks. Second generation larvae cause ear damage (Figure 5); they tunnel in the shank (Figure 6); and feed on silks, kernels, and cobs. Signs of infestation include: dropped ears, broken shanks, stalk breakage, sawdust-like castings on leaves, and holes in the stalks.


#17 str8dank

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 12:46 AM

interesting read, i never knew much about bugs

#18 skriblz

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 02:04 AM

TY ;)

#19 doc111

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 01:45 PM

I started using the mosquito dunks in my watering/feed regimen. I'll be sure to report back on how well it works.weed_4u

#20 weezer

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 02:08 PM

Thanks bunny
I have EINSTEIN OIL,,

NOT JUST ANOTHER NEEM OIL..so the pitch goes
Also have a surfactant

HOw often do you think it should be sprayed ,,I know there are a lot of factors,,but are you thinkin ,hours or days.


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